Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Still freaking out (IWSG)

It is that time again. I get to share with the whole world what an insecure mess I am. For those that don’t like whining, please stop reading now.

Okay people, my manuscript is back from my editor and the comments make a ton of sense and explain perfectly where I had gone wrong. Also, the mistakes I made can easily be fixed. So why am I so afraid of approaching my manuscript? I see the notes and I get overwhelmed. I told myself that I would take it page by page, but I have already psyched myself out.

I think I just need to suck it up, take a big girl pill and start working. The manuscript is not going to change itself. I know all this, so why do I feel so afraid? Do any of you ever feel this way? Maybe I just need a kick to the backside. Any of you want to deliver the blow?

The Insecure Writers Support Group was created by the talented Mr. Alex J. Cavanaugh so that writers can share their insecurities and/or encourage others who need support with their own. You can visit Alex Here, or if you want to join us in discussing our insecurities on the first Wednesday of each month, you are welcome to join by going Here.

57 comments :

  1. Set all the other pages aside and focus on one. Out of sight, out of mind. Start there and move forward. You can do it!

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    1. Thank you, Alex. Your encouragement always helps.

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  2. I feel that way about every manuscript of mine that I have to edit. I drag my feet. Do things I usually put off to put off working on the manuscript, but no one else can fix it, except the writer. One page at a time is good to focus on. Or focus on a particular point and work on it through the manuscript and then move on to the next point. Good luck!

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    1. Thank you, Cherie. That is excellent advice. It really helps. Fixing one thing at a time throughout the manuscript sounds like a great plan. Thank you.

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  3. When I got one of my ms back I nearly cried. I kept asking myself, why'd the publisher even want it if it was so terrible? But I breathed deep, waited a day or two, and got to work one page at a time. In the end it will be great!!! Good Luck and take your time...

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    1. Thank you! I think I'm getting ahead of myself. One page at a time does sound like a great plan.

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  4. Is there really a big-girl pill! Can I have one, please!!!

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    1. I pretend there is. Just eat a lot of sweets and tell yourself you're eating big girl pills :)

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  5. I feel this way all the time when I get a piece back from an editor. In fact I am struggling with it right now! Maybe we could both take a big girl pill and get to work. Hang in there and good luck, you can do it!

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    1. Thank you! I should really invent a big girl pill. I can make a fortune:)

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  6. I totally understand. When my last book came back from the editor, it had so many comments that I debated stepping away. I didn't. Instead I started into it and was SHOCKED only two days later to have burned through everything. Yes, two days. That's not normal, but I did have a crazy short deadline. Best of luck with it, and don't be afraid to dive!

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    1. Thank you. Wow, two days? You are awesome! I hope to have a moment of clarity soon.

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  7. Murees, I always approach edits by getting the easy stuff out of the way first. The word changes, the tense tweaks, all the yeah, fine, whatevers, go ahead and change it things. That leaves the meaty changes where you have to weigh whether or not you want to fight for it or just go for it and gitter done. Once all the piddly stuff is done, the rest isn't so daunting.

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    1. Oh wow! Thank you! That does make a lot of sense. You are amazing.

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  8. Think of it as the home stretch, even though it seems like a lot. You've done the hardest job by getting the story down! Now, it would be a shame not to take it all the way. Just focus on one page, scene or chapter at a time, then move on to the next.

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    1. Thank you, Nick. Breaking it down into smaller bits makes a lot of sense. I will definitely do that.

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  9. I'm taking a Revising class online and in one of the sessions they feature this quote how the 'best writing is rewriting.' I can understand being nervous and afraid even when you know the changes will make your work stronger. I had and still do have the same feeling because it feels as if I'm starting all over again from the chopping block. As if I'm killing my work. When I think my real issue is that all those needed changes are signs of my inadequacy. But Rome wasn't built in a day, the same for your book. So take a deep breath and some time away from it. Then dive right in.

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    1. Thank you so much, Lidy. Your words are really kind and inspiring.

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  10. Ha! You're already way ahead of me! I got notes back last week but haven't even opened them up. How lame is that? You'll tackle this revision wonderfully, one page at a time. Good luck :)

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  11. I would love to have your malady because it would mean I submitted a manuscript. But I can speak from the editing side. Last month I asked a writer for a new chapter to fill in some gaps in his book, and he rewrote so fast it made my head spin. After reading it, I felt amazed at his imagination. I have an idea your editor will be as impressed once you send your ms back, but fear of failing won't go away until you do. I bet you'll feel better than now by getting past that fear--and even if your editor doesn't like all the revisions. you'll get another markup with a much smaller batch of problems to fix. But if you need more incentive, the best big girl pill I know is chocolate. Buy a bag but don't eat any until you go through at least one chapter, and reward yourself at the end of each hurdle.

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    1. Thank you for your kind words. Chocolate is definitely a good incentive. You are so right. I am afraid, but I need to get over it.

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  12. Try one sentence at a time. Yes, we've all been there, so no worries. You're not alone. A huge task can be daunting. Chunk it down as small as you need to. I know you can do it.

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    1. Thank you. Small portions at a time sounds like a good idea.

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  13. Many years ago I had to write a short speech to give in church about our women's group. I told my husband (husband at the time) that I couldn't do it. I didn't know what to say. I cried. Finally, I wrote one sentence. The next sentence came naturally. I was done in ten minutes. We all have fears.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. Thank you, Janie. I just have to conquer mine.

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    2. I don't know. Sometimes fear motivates us. I just don't want you to be so afraid that you panic. You can write. You are a good writer.

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  14. Haven't gotten that far where I've had to experience it. Maybe by the time I do, you'll be able to talk me through it.
    I have heard that you should let it set a week or two to settle down, but don't know how much time they give you to fix. Good Luck!

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    1. Thank you. I hope my experience will be of help.

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  15. That sense of being overwhelmed is common. It's something I'm going through at the moment too because I've taken on so much. The only way through (that I've found) is to take it in small bites. One step at a time.

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    1. Thank you, Lynda. I will try the small bites at a time. At this point I will try anything.

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  16. Every time I get edits back, I psyche myself out too. I do the same, say I am going to take it page by page. However then I find myself wanting to go through the entire thing all at once.

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    1. Very true. I hope i get inspired soon.

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  17. As many others are saying, I get that anxiety every time I get edits back. You just have to dive right now. Usually afterward, I realize it wasn't too bad. :) Good luck!

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    1. Thank you Christine! I think you are right. The only way to get over my fear, is to face it head-on.

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  18. Don't beat yourself up. It takes time to re-imagine something you've been working on for months. The suggestions must feel very alien to you atm. Give yourself time to relax and do other things -- but keep the new ideas in the back of your mind. Slowly, things will come into focus and you'll have an easier time with the revisions. Good luck!!

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  19. Congrat in getting your MS back. I get it, the hesitation the reluctance. I experience even without getting feedback from others, lol.

    Maybe see the feedback as a Writer's Badge e.g. like a sheriff, now put on the badge, pull out the big guns and get to work protecting that MS. You are fearless, you are the Word Police, now get to editing, lol.

    My blog
    Juneta at Writer's Gambit

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    1. Thank you! Those are amazing words and it worked. I am inspired!

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  20. I'd be lying if I said I am not affected. I am. It overwhelms me when I get my stuff back--even from beta readers--but something I do notice is that once I get into it, I actually look forward to tackling it on a daily basis and soon, I look forward to working with it. I soon get lost in the characters and plot again and love seeing it become better with the pass. I know you will too! :) (It helps to have a writing buddy to "mull" over with)

    ♥.•*¨Elizabeth¨*•.♥

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    1. Thank you, Elizabeth! I hope to become that excited about my manuscript too. My editor is really fantastic and mulls things over with me.

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  21. You can do it Murees. Your story won't bite and starting to fix things is the hardest part. It'll get easier.

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  22. Sometimes editing off of notes is like a huge deadly Jenga game to me. Like...If I change one tiny part here, the whole thing is going to topple onto my head. But it never happens. My editor knows her stuff.

    Breathe...eat some chocolate...and get to work, missy. :)

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    1. Thank you! I think I'm afraid of making the changes and then screwing things up too. I'm off to work now.

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  23. I felt the same way when I got my last ms back from my editor. Paralyzed. I set it aside for a couple of weeks then went back to it. The space helped. Good luck.

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    1. Thank you. I'm afraid if I give my manuscript anymore space I might never get back to it again. But I'm on my way to get started now.

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  24. Murees, I think you are AMAZING!
    You've already completed a book. Written it from beginning to end. If you can do that, then you can do anything else.
    I know you can! Now go tackle that ms!
    I'm sending you a boost of positivity--------- all the way across the country---

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    1. Thank you so much, Michelle! YOU are amazing. I'm getting those positive vibes. Thank you for thinking of me.

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  25. I have to echo Michelle's comment, though I'll admit I can't always take my own advice. :) The fact that you've written a book is HUGE. There will always be something to edit, whether it be from you finding something to improve or an editor providing their constructive -- though often painful -- feedback. But you've created that book that needs editing in the first place, and that's an accomplishment in and of itself. Good luck with the edits!

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    1. Thank you so much! I need all the luck I can get. Wishing you well.

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  26. write write n keeping writing keep improving keep correcting as you got the talent... editing recreates a book in a better way... only after editing should it reach the readers... to get a book published is sometimes a hard task best wishes smiles:))

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    1. Thank you, Adhi! I will keep working and making my writing better. Wishing you well.

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  27. Consider this a kick! Good luck with your edits. I think taking it a page at a time makes sense, though I imagine I'd be overwhelmed with it, too.

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    1. Thank you for the much need kick. It is exactly what I needed.

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  28. I hated editing my book - I felt like it was a huge, unattainable task, but like the others have said, if you break it down into smaller chunks, it becomes a lot more manageable :). I ended up actually enjoying whipping my story into shape in the end. Also, like Nick said, you've done the bulk of the work already! Now you're on the home stretch :)! Sending you lots of positive thoughts from sunny ol' England :)! YOU CAN DO IT!

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    1. Thank you for your kind words and encouragement, Rachel. You are amazing.

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